ICMR Issues New Guidelines on Tea and Coffee Consumption, Advises Against Milk Tea and Warns of Overconsumption Risks

ICMR Issues New Guidelines on Tea and Coffee Consumption, Advises Against Milk Tea and Warns of Overconsumption Risks

ICMR Issues New Guidelines on Tea and Coffee Consumption, Advises Against Milk Tea and Warns of Overconsumption Risks

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Latest ICMR guidelines on caffeine spark a stir in tea and coffee consumption

In a world where tea and coffee are staples of daily life for millions, a recent announcement from the Indian Council of Medical Research (ICMR) and the National Institute of Nutrition (NIN) is causing quite a buzz. Lately with the rising concerns about caffeine consumption and its impact on health, ICMR and NIN jointly have brewed up 17 new dietary guidelines, aiming to foster healthier habits nationwide. Let’s take a sip into what these guidelines entail and how they could impact our daily routines. 

One of the most significant revelations from the new guidelines is the call for moderation in tea and coffee consumption. The main reason that has been cited is the health concern related to caffeine therefore, the ICMR recommends limiting your daily intake to 300 milligrams. This has provoked tea and coffee lovers to reconsider their daily dose of brew.

Understanding the Buzz: The Science Behind Caffeine

But why the caution around caffeine? According to researchers at the ICMR, caffeine, a compound found in both tea as well as coffee, stimulates the central nervous system and can give rise to a feeling of dependency on it. This means that our beloved morning cuppa may come with some strings attached to our health.

Decoding the Numbers: Caffeine Content in Popular Beverages

The guidelines also shed light on the caffeine content found in popular beverages. Did you know that a 150ml cup of brewed coffee contains between 80 to 120 mg of caffeine, while instant coffee ranges from 50 to 65 mg? Tea, on the other hand, offers a milder kick, with approximately 30 to 65 mg of caffeine per serving. It’s essential to keep these numbers in mind as we navigate our caffeine intake throughout the day.

To mitigate potential health risks, the guidelines advise abstaining from tea or coffee consumption at least an hour before and after meals. Why? It’s all about the tannins. These compounds, found in tea and coffee, can inhibit iron absorption in the body by binding to it, potentially leading to conditions like anemia. By giving our bodies a break from these beverages around meal times, we can ensure optimal iron absorption and overall well-being.

But it’s not all doom and gloom for tea enthusiasts. The guidelines note that drinking tea without milk offers certain health benefits, including improved blood circulation and a reduced risk of conditions like coronary artery disease and stomach cancer. So, if you’re a tea lover, there’s still room for your favorite brew in a balanced diet.

The authorities have urged consumers to take proper, balanced meals and not depend entirely on tea and coffee. They advocate for a diet rich in fruits, vegetables, whole grains, lean meats, and seafood at the same time advising on limiting the consumption of excess salt, sugar and oil. By embracing the variety on our plates, we can fuel our bodies with essential nutrients and promote overall health and well-being. It’s a gentle reminder to savor the flavors of nature and nourish ourselves from the inside out.