Pune Water Crisis: Water Release For Rural Areas Stopped From Khadakwasla Dam

Pune Water Crisis: Water Release For Rural Areas Stopped From Khadakwasla Dam

Pune Water Crisis: Water Release For Rural Areas Stopped From Khadakwasla Dam

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Pune: The release of water from the Khadakwasla dam into the Mutha canal for rural areas has been halted as most ponds and lakes in these regions are now filled with water. The combined stock in four dams within the Khadakwasla circle has dropped to 7 TMC (24%), marking a decrease of 2.6 TMC compared to last year’s storage of 9.6 TMC (33%).

With at least two more months before the expected onset of rain, officials from the irrigation department have assured that sufficient water reserves have been maintained in dams to fulfill the city’s drinking water needs until July. A decision regarding the next release of water for rural areas is slated to be made around May 31.

During the recently concluded water release rotation, approximately 5.9 TMC water was discharged over a period of 65 days, exceeding the scheduled plan of a 45-day-long rotation by about 20 days. This extension was primarily aimed at ensuring that areas like Daund, Indapur, and Haveli, which have been grappling with water scarcity, receive adequate water supply.

Parts of Daund and Indapur have been designated as drought-prone areas by the state government, as they received insufficient rainfall during the last monsoon season. The deficit in water storage this year, amounting to over 2 TMC, is attributed to the inadequate and premature conclusion of the rainy season.

Despite facing these challenges, the irrigation department has managed to supply sufficient water to both rural and urban areas of Pune. However, officials have urged the Pune Municipal Corporation (PMC) to use water judiciously in the coming months. PMC officials, on the other hand, have indicated that there are no immediate plans to impose water cuts in the city and are consulting with the irrigation department regarding the water stock in dams.

Considering that the city draws around 1.5 TMC of water monthly from Khadakwasla, it will require over 3 TMC of water until mid-July. While the existing 7 TMC stock surpasses the city’s immediate requirement, officials remain cautious about evaporation losses and the need to allocate water for rural areas.